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Factory Tour

A bit of fabric softener is added to the dye bath, to break in the fibers.

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Factory Tour

A “lab dip” is our first step in developing a new color. The dyes shown here are already diluted to the proper intensity for color testing a single small piece of fabric in a beaker. After dyeing, the fabric undergoes a rinsing process and then into the dryer.

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Factory Tour

These black-and-white striped T-shirts will be over-dyed, so the white stripes become pink or red or deep blue. We also over-dye floral and geometric patterns, giving the prints added richness and interest.

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Factory Tour

Natural shell buttons are a Cut Loose favorite in Spring and Summer, on pants, shirts, jackets, and dresses.

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Factory Tour

A sample sewer puts a finishing touch on a top she’s made.

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Factory Tour

At any given time, roughly 2000 rolls of fabric are on hand in the warehouse — many whites and a few prints. Once a fabric is selected for a specific style, it is cut and sewn into various sizes. Garment-dyeing in the seasonal palette will be the final step, as orders are received from boutiques.

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Factory Tour

The sample cutter uses a small electric scissors to cut pattern pieces for a sample sewer.

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Factory Tour

Swatches show how seasonal colors look on all the different fabrics. Because garments are sewn and then dyed, a boutique can customize each season’s selection by ordering pieces in colors most popular with their customers.

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Factory Tour

Our color library includes the color recipe for every swatch. The formula provides the percentages for dyeing different volumes of garments (by weight) to our standard intensity and color saturation.

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Factory Tour

The inspiration board takes shape over several weeks, as ideas from images, fabrics, trims and trend resources evolve into a plan for the next season’s line.